3 years of Daily Kirby

Why Copy Jack Kirby’s Work?

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I realized in starting to draw Julius Caesar, based on Jack Kirby’s designs, I was in trouble. Shakespeare didn’t work as comics, Kirby’s work based in action was a bad way to approach Shakespeare, I was lost. To study Kirby’s work, I started copying a page a day. To study Shakespeare, I just made the comic. Huge walls of greatness loomed in front of me. There was nothing to do but draw.
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What makes a comic without any characters.

Comics have characters, places and things, a plot with events no matter how surreal. From Batman to the latest hipster wildness, characters take action in a world. Comics telling those stories is the same practice that Homer engaged in around a fire, the creation of empathy, narrative suspense, and fascination. If you remove the characters, the empathy, the narrative drive traditionalists think there is nothing there. But it’s a rich nothing that has paper, ink, paint, a cartoonist, a reader, pages, things that make a book. Can that basic of a book exist outside of narrative traditions?

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Alan Haverholm’s “When the Last Story is told”, is a 61 page graphic novel. It has no words, a six-panel grid and pages that look like late minimalism, others pages look like action painting, still more are paper and or photo collages.

You can’t consume this like a traditional comic, with no words you can’t even read it. As you you turn pages you have to ask yourself why? In a book, 61 collages become one object. As one object each panel now has a relationship with all the other panels. The first page with juicy thick white paint built over collaged paper declares itself as “Art” these days. A textural stamped black smudge runs out underneath panel 2 and leads the eye to turn the page.

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